Various Vitamin Tablets Supplements

Simple & Easy: Daily Multivitamin May Improve Cognition and Protect Against Mental Decline

Selon de nouvelles recherches, la prise quotidienne d’un supplément de vitamines et de minéraux peut améliorer la cognition chez les personnes âgées.

La prise quotidienne d’un supplément de multivitamines pourrait-elle aider à maintenir la santé cognitive avec le vieillissement et éventuellement prévenir le déclin cognitif ? Selon de nouvelles recherches, c’est possible. Une nouvelle étude a révélé que la prise d’un supplément quotidien peut améliorer la cognition chez les personnes âgées, mais des études supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour confirmer ces résultats avant que des recommandations de santé puissent être faites. L’étude a également montré que l’utilisation quotidienne d’un supplément d’extrait de cacao n’est pas bénéfique pour la cognition.

Les conclusions des chercheurs de la Wake Forest University School of Medicine, menées en collaboration avec le Brigham and Women’s Hospital de Boston, ont été publiées le 14 septembre dans

More than 6.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Furthermore, 1 in 3 seniors die with the disease or another form of dementia.

Laura Baker Wake Forest University School of Medicine

Laura D. Baker, Ph.D., professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, led the COSMOS-Mind trial, which shows taking a daily supplement may improve cognition in older adults. Credit: Wake Forest University School of Medicine

“There’s an urgent need for safe and affordable interventions to protect cognition against decline in older adults,” said Laura D. Baker, Ph.D., professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and co-principal investigator of the trial, along with Mark Espeland, Ph.D., professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

Laura Baker

Laura D. Baker, Ph.D., professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Credit: Wake Forest University School of Medicine

The COcoa Supplement and Multivitamin Outcomes Study for the Mind (COSMOS-Mind), was an ancillary study to the COSMOS trial led by Brigham and Women’s Hospital that randomized 21,442 men and women across the U.S. The study investigated whether taking a daily cocoa extract supplement or a daily multivitamin-mineral supplement reduces the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, cancer, and other health outcomes. It was funded by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health.

According to Baker, cocoa extract is rich in compounds called flavanols, and past research indicates that these compounds may positively impact cognition. In addition, Baker said that several micronutrients and minerals are needed to support normal body and brain function, and deficiencies in older adults may increase the risk for cognitive decline and dementia.

In COSMOS-Mind, scientists tested whether daily administration of cocoa extract versus placebo and a multivitamin-mineral versus placebo improved cognition in older adults. More than 2,200 participants, ages 65 and older, were enrolled, and they were followed for three years. To evaluate memory and other cognitive abilities, participants completed tests over the telephone at baseline and annually.

Mark Espeland

Mark Espeland, Ph.D., professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Credit: Wake Forest University School of Medicine

“Our study showed that although cocoa extract did not affect cognition, daily multivitamin-mineral supplementation resulted in statistically significant cognitive improvement,” Baker said. “This is the first evidence of cognitive benefit in a large longer-term study of multivitamin supplementation in older adults.”

According to the researchers’ estimations, three years of multivitamin supplementation roughly translated to a 60% slowing of cognitive decline (about 1.8 years). The results showed that benefits were relatively more pronounced in participants with significant cardiovascular disease, which is important because these individuals are already at increased risk for cognitive impairment and decline.

“It’s too early to recommend daily multivitamin supplementation to prevent cognitive decline,” Baker said. “While these preliminary findings are promising, additional research is needed in a larger and more diverse group of people. Also, we still have work to do to better understand why the multivitamin might benefit cognition in older adults.”

For more on this research, see Daily Multivitamin May Slow Cognitive Aging.

Reference: “Effects of cocoa extract and a multivitamin on cognitive function: A randomized clinical trial” by Laura D. Baker, Joann E. Manson, Stephen R. Rapp, Howard D. Sesso, Sarah A. Gaussoin, Sally A. Shumaker and Mark A. Espeland, 14 September 2022, Alzheimer s & Dementia.
DOI: 10.1002/alz.12767

The COcoa Supplement and Multivitamin Outcomes Study (COSMOS) is supported by an investigator-initiated grant from

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